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How to Improve Your Ad CTR (Click-Through-Rate)

So people aren't clicking on your ads? It hurts, right? I know, I’ve been there. In the last few weeks, we've looked at the creative aspects of our ads, as well as our headlines with a brilliant hook to capture the attention of our ideal customer and audience. Maybe they are looking and reading the ad, but then they're not clicking that all too important CTR link click that's taking them over to the page that we want them to. This may be happening because the messaging is not on point. In this episode of Online Confidential, we’re focused on our messaging and diving into 5 strategies that you can use when evaluating your ad’s messaging.

Now, our message is a bit different from our copy. The message is the essence of the ad copy. Ask yourself, is it going to actually be resonating and triggering emotional responses with our ideal clients? Those people that we've put the ad out in front of, we've done all that audience research in our targeting, and they should be converting, but they're not. It's that messaging that may be a miss.

So today we're going to look at five things that you can review to help get your messaging in your ad copy on point so that people take that action that you want them to.

#1 Is it too formal?
Is it a bit stiff? Is it a bit rigid? We are on Facebook. We're on social media. This is a fairly casual environment. Yes, you do need to remember to stay on point with your brand, but on social media with our Facebook ads, this is where we can loosen it up a bit. We don't want to have it like they're reading a prospectus about going to college. We can slide down a bit into a more informal conversation. They're on social media and remember this is the platform where they are hanging out to look at what their sister or their friends are getting up to. And they're not using formal language. So be sensitive and be aware of the platform while remembering who your ideal client is and talk to them in a way that's a bit more relational and not so formal.

#2 Is the ad copy too vanilla.
This can be really tricky sometimes, especially when you are talking about business opportunities or ways that people make more money working from home. The kinds of things that we try and maybe skirt around sometimes. Therefore we make things too vanilla, or maybe you're not trying to skirt around anything and just the ad copy is still too vanilla. Now ways that we can make it a bit un-vanilla is when we really dig into a few points when you know your ideal avatar. One of the ways that I recommend my elite ad managers do some research to dig into avatars is to go and look at Amazon and go and look at book reviews or look at YouTube channels and see what people are saying in the comments. Look at those exact words that the ideal client is saying and use that in the ad copy. When you do that also dig in a bit further and amplify things a bit more. If there are particular pain points, look at twisting the knife. What does it actually mean to not be able to make ends meet? When you are only just scraping by and you're paying the bills each week. Maybe you're not able to get on that holiday or spend some time on the beach, and that's just not going to be possible. The best you can do is to just drive two hours into state and stay at a hotel there as your holiday. And what's that going to mean? The family memories that aren't going to be created, the experiences, or the the pina colada. Twist the knife, amplify things, and highlight even more what the benefits are, what their dreams are, what their goals are, and the impact that can be made when they achieve those dreams and goals.

#3 Posting too much jargon.
A lot of us can be caught up in the curse of the expert where we say, so this is what we do and what we solve, and what we fix. But it's all wrapped up in this jargon that we are using. For example, the ideal client, typically, isn't say, “Oh, I need to sort out my mindset.” They might be thinking, why do I always do this? But they're not using that word mindset. You have to change your mindset, shift your mindset, but they're still thinking about why they're doing what they do every day or the actions that they take, or why do they always find themselves in this particular situation? So remove the jargon from your ad copy and put it back into relatable terms. Go to Amazon, look at the reviews, see what people are actually saying and it will help you remove the jargon.

How to run facebook ads for clients

#4 Look at me!
Where we're talking about ourselves too often, all the people that I have helped, how I've been able to quit working the nine to five job, and how I now live on the beach and work remotely. And blah-blah-blah all of that stuff. That's about me, me, me. So we want to make sure that we keep it about our ideal client. You can evidence that by mentioning people that you have helped, like how Jackie has been able to quit her corporate job. And now she's working from home being able to enjoy a work-life balance, being able to be at home when the kids come home from school and being able to have holidays whenever she likes because she doesn't have to put in for a request from the boss. So taking it off of us, ourselves, our accomplishments, and shining the light on others around us sharing stories of those that we've been able to help and how these lives have been changed and how they're so similar. Those same benefits that your other ideal clients are also wanting to achieve.

#5 Say more with less
Look at the copy that you have written, and then look at how you can take out extra words. How can you condense things down so that it packs more of a punch with fewer words? Remember, more words don’t mean more impact. Think and ask yourself, how can I shuffle this around so that it's more precise, more concise, and achieves all the goals of having less waffle, less jargon, less about me, and being able to really speak to your ideal client.

When doing all of these things, you will see that you will naturally make ad copy more effective. You'll be reducing the jargon and you'll be reducing the waffle. What you have left is a message that is really going to resonate with your ideal audience. It's going to speak to them exactly and they’ll be saying, “Oh my gosh, you’re in my head. That's exactly where I'm at now and exactly what I'm wanting to achieve.”

Then they're going to click on that ad and head over to the landing page. Again, make sure that the landing page is congruent with your ad so that if your ad has that great click-through rate, meaning it's 1% or more, it's resonating with your ideal audience. You can see then if people get over to the landing page and then they're not converting as they should be, you go, well, the ad is doing its job. Let's line up the landing page to be congruent with the ad and see if we get those conversion rates increasing.

I hope you found this beneficial, go in and have a look at the copy that you've got running now and see how you can apply those five tips to the ad copy to improve your click-through rates on your ads.

If you'd like to know more about being an in-demand ad manager, head over and grab the ad manager guide at admanagerguide.com and discover the steps to becoming an in-demand ad manager and how I was able to do it. Go from $12 an hour to making seven figures, running ads for clients.

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How do you avoid unexpected surprises when you take on a new client for your ad management services?

 
So what happens to many, many ad managers they'll get a new client on board, and then they get access to the ads manager. They start investigating their clients funnels or lack thereof, and discover that they are in for a bit of a nightmare when it comes to tidying things up, putting things together, having to build a landing page and all the rest of the stuff that goes with running Facebook ads. This is something that I've heard from a lot of ad managers and some conversations we've had recently over in my inner circle membership, where we have lots of ad managers in there sharing their expertise and asking lots of questions and getting the support they need as an ad manager. Now, one of the things that I really recommend before you take an ad client on board is to have a look under the hood. You need to know what you're getting yourself into, right? 

While you'll have a client that might come on board and they'll say oh yeah, we were running some ads and XYZed and everything was going good. I just don't want to do it all myself. Then if you just take them on board without seeing their funnel, without seeing their ads manager backend, you don't know what you're getting yourself in for.

So when you have your initial conversations with clients, the directions that I like to take and that I'm teaching the students in my elite ad manager program is to have two options. First of all, get on a call, have a bit of a Q & A like just 20 minutes tops hearing about their stories with their Facebook ads. Why they've reached out to you cause obviously they're in some sort of pain that they want to get resolved. So that's why they're on the phone with you.

So you can learn a bit more about them, a bit more about their business, and initially to see if they may be a good fit for your business. From there, you'll go. Okay. Look, I would love to know some more. I've got some more questions. Let's jump on another call. And then from that call is when you're positioning the direction that you're going to be taking.

How to run facebook ads for clients

And it depends on two things. One, if they have run Facebook ads before two, if they have not run Facebook ads before now, you might think, Oh, they haven't run Facebook ads before. There's nothing to check in their ads manager. There's nothing to do. I'll just get them on board and away we go. You need to make sure that they have assets in place that they have a strategy to be running their Facebook ads, whether it is initially off to a funnel, or if they don't even have a funnel, what they could be doing, they could just be doing audience building campaigns. While they're waiting for a funnel to get built. 

So there's a strategy that you could be working on with them to get in a position where they can run their Facebook ads. So going from those initial calls and offering them a strategy session is a great way for you to establish the route that they're going to need to take, to get started with Facebook ads. Now that may also be including whether they need a landing page. They may need a lead magnet. They may need an email CRM. Even if you're doing lead form ads on Facebook, getting it hooked up with Zapier and over to the CRM. All those things need to be accounted for. And that's where you as an ad manager need to be aware because one, it may come back to you to create them or two you'll need to refer it to them and their team to create all. 

Or three, if you are taking that on board, then charging your services accordingly, either to cover your own time, to do all of that, or to outsource it to someone who is, you know, well-skilled in setting all that up for you so that you can focus on your ad management, if that's what you choose. And then you've got someone else that you can outsource tech stuff and funnel builds and such. So having a strategy session where you sit down, you lay everything out with them, what they have in place at the moment, and therefore get a framework for what they're going to need. And that framework they can either take off and go and do themselves and implement that's fine.

Or they can say that is way too much stuff. I would love to just pay you to do that for me, which happens a lot of the time. Now with these strategy sessions, are they free or are they paid? It depends where you are in your journey. Okay? If you are just starting out, you may want to do a couple for free just to get some notches on your belt.

Now that could be to some friends that, you know, even some other business owners posted on your Facebook page, that you know, you're offering a couple of strategy sessions you're getting started. And so if you've got a business reach out, I'd love to do a couple with you. And then they could be case studies or testimonials for you. Or you could just charge like a hundred dollars.

So even getting a hundred dollars to be doing this is a great experience for you. It's paying you a bit for your time, as well as showing a level of commitment from your client or potential client that they're willing to invest in you and in their services, in their marketing.  So a strategy session is a fantastic way for you to look under the hood, see what's going on. Now, if they have been running ads, then you want to be looking in their ads manager. So from that second call, that's where you would be going on to promote an audit. So that audit is a great way for you to go in, see what ads have been running and see where they have been sending their traffic to.

You can also then see, have they been using their pixels correctly? Yes or no. Have they even been using any pixels? Have they been using the right objectives? So again, from there, you've got great insight into what's going to need to be done on their ad account to start making things work better. 

Also, it gives you a chance to show your expertise by saying look, did you know that you were running traffic campaigns when you were actually wanting people to opt in for your lead magnet? We need to be running conversion campaigns that'll work much more effectively for you.  So making sure that you pick up little things like that, you can present back to them and they go, Holy cow. She knows what she's talking about.

Positioning yourself as the authority there. Now, again, this I recommend is a paid audit, but if you're starting out and want to get some experience you can do a strategy session. You could just post on your page, Any business owners that have been running Facebook ads. I am wanting to do a couple of audits. Again, they can be case studies, testimonials, some practice ones, or even again, charge a hundred dollars. But workup as you can charge $1000 or $2,000 for these audits.  People know the value of them because one sale could cover the cost of the audit. So strategy sessions and audits are two ways that I really recommend before you take on a new ad management client, you need to do those.

So you can see what's under the hood and know what you are in for. You can either then be saying, okay, this is what needs to be done for either the strategy session or the audit. Give that back to the potential client. They can run off and do it themselves. If you've charged for the audit, you've been paid either way. So your time is covered. Otherwise you can offer to do the Facebook ads or to implement it all. And here it is, it's all laid out. This is the price point for it. And they'll say, great. I'll love to get you to do them for me. 

So in order to avoid getting yourself into those situations, getting clients on board that don't have a funnel and having to do a quick bit of a funnel build because you’re charging them for ads. And, you need somewhere to run ads to and get results. You know what you need to do. You can charge accordingly so that therefore your business is more profitable and you're not spending hours and hours on one account and not being paid accordingly for it.

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What do you do if you have a potential client who may not be quite ready for Facebook ads?

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What do you do If you have a potential client who may not be quite ready for Facebook ads?

So you have a great potential client and they've reached out to you and they're wanting to know how to run Facebook ads or how you can run their Facebook ads for them.

In a previous post I shared strategies that I like to use to look under the hood and determine if someone is going to be a great fit for our Facebook ad services. That's either via strategy session if they haven't run any ads before or doing an audit, if they have run Facebook ads. So either of those ways you get a good insight of their business, what assets they have in place and where they're at, whether they should, or shouldn't even be running Facebook ads at this stage.

I know a lot of people who have run Facebook ads and they haven't been entirely ready. They've just banged some stuff up and they haven't had pixels installed. They have just been sending people to whatever random pages and it's been like a bit of a hot mess.
But if you've used either of those strategies and you've gone in and you've looked at the assets that they have in place, then you need to be honest and give that potential client clear expectations of what you have seen and what results they may expect with their existing setup.

For example, in my elite ad manager program, we recently had a member who had a potential client and they didn't have the assets set up that you really need to run Facebook ads and didn’t even have the pixel installed.

You need to be able to track conversions on the thank you page so that when you're running ads for lead gen, you can tell Facebook, go out and find people who are likely to opt in. And if you don't have that pixel tracking in place, you can't run the correct objectives and Facebook can't optimize correctly for you.

So there's a few things that are not quite ideal in this situation. So what do you do when things like that happen? Well, don't sugar coat things. Give those real expectations that as you've discovered with the potential clients funnel, that here's an issue, here's an issue and here's an issue. And these really need to be resolved before we run Facebook ads.
How to Run Facebook Ads for clients

Because if they're not resolved, then we cannot do X, Y, and Z. And therefore your ad spend will not be as efficient as it should be. We will not be able to attract conversions and we will not be able to XYZ. So you need to lay that out very clearly. One so that your client is properly informed.
They're not Facebook ad specialists. They don't know the ins and outs like you do. So they need to be properly informed of the consequences of their existing tech setup. And also it's protecting you that if you do take them on board as a client, that you have exactly laid out that you haven't given any false promises, guarantees, or yeah we'll be able to get a hundred leads.

So if you do identify situations like this, where it's like, yeah, they're using a third party software, we can't put the pixel on it. So we can't track our conversions. You need to lay that all out. If the client were to say, yep, that's fine. Look, I'm happy to give it a go anyway, let's just see what we can do. Then you have two choices. One, you could either walk away. You could say, well, okay, that's great but unfortunately, I wouldn't be the best fit for you because it's essential to me that I get results for my clients. And therefore I need to be able to track and optimize your Facebook ad campaigns.

So walk away. There's no harm in doing that. And chances are, when you say no to something, something better comes along or option two is you can do it as a bit of a test if you are needing experience, if you are wanting to launch campaigns and such, you could just do this, but what you need to be very clear on then is that the client is a hundred percent informed of like, here's where we're going to have issues because we cannot do X, Y, and Z. So don't just leave that on a proposal or on a zoom call or on a telephone call, make sure if they are coming on board, that it is in your agreement that you would say, the client has been advised that with their current funnel setup, we cannot do this sort of tracking. We cannot do this. We cannot optimize our Facebook ad campaigns, which may result in inefficient ad spend, you know, lowly generation and XYZ. So it is all there in black and white in that agreement that they sign.

So that if in a month's time, everything seems to have gone over their head. They forgot you telling them this is what's going to happen. And they say, we're not getting any leads, what's happening. You can say, as it's noted in our agreement, the issues that were presented to you back when we started X, Y, and Z. And then once they actually see it for themselves and they go, Oh, okay. So, you know, this is what this all actually means.

Then they may say, okay, well how much for a landing page or okay do a landing page for me. And that's when you would say great I'd be happy to. I'll just get a price for you. That's not included in your services and is an additional fee.So make sure that if things aren't all set up properly and they still want to carry on anyway, you've protected yourself. It's all there in black and white. And therefore, if they decide that they do need to have that funnel, as you have advised them in the past that you charge accordingly for it.

So, that's a couple of things if they're not ready and if they're particularly wanting to get people off Facebook and be generating their leads. Now there are times where a potential client may not have website assets in place. But you can still run ads for them by running some engagement and video view campaigns directly on Facebook. It's what I share in my $10 a day client attraction code.
And that is where you are building up an audience, you're doing targeting, you're drawing in their potential ideal clients, and you're nurturing them. And you're creating a bit of a buzz around content pieces that you're then retargeting to that audience.

Now through that they can have people reaching out to them via messenger. They could be putting up the links that could be to their Facebook page for more information and various other things like that. So they can still be generating leads and sales by starting conversations with people who are engaging with them directly by a messenger.

I wouldn't have just Facebook as your one and only strategy. We want to ideally get people off Facebook over onto their CRM, over onto their email list, where they can communicate with them at any time so that if Facebook shuts down their page or shuts down their ad account, they can still contact them via email.

But, if they've already got that in place, then audience building on Facebook is a great way to combine with it. If they're building those assets, if they're getting them in place, you can start running ads for them by running those engagement campaigns and doing audience building. So then when the assets are ready, they've got that lead magnet or that webinar or whatever it is that they want to send people to.

You can be retargeting that audience and start directing them over to that lead magnet, opt in or their offer. The most essential thing that they're going to need beyond website assets and such is a product, offer or service that people want, and that people have already been buying. So they've been making organic sales just by being in Facebook groups or talking to people or via their networks, they need to have a product, offer or service that has been selling so that you have the best chances of being able to help them to promote it.

If they are just starting up, then that's a whole different kettle of fish where they need to really be investing in data to see if their product, offer or service is going to be selling. So if they do have something that has been selling initially already, then yes, you can support them with Facebook ads, either audience building, lead gen or if they don't have funnels in place, then they'll probably learn pretty quick that we'll need to get funnels in place, but you need to set those clear, honest expectations of where there may be limitations and issues because of this existing setup and make sure that's clear in writing.

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What is one of the best skills you can have as an ad manager

What is one of the best skills you can have as an ad manager, it may not be what you think. So being an ad manager, you probably think there were a lot of skills that are required, and yes there is. And you may think one of those skills is being a Facebook ad Ninja. Well, it is, but there is something that is even more important than being able to launch campaigns, measure the ROI, see what the click through rate is and optimize all the stuffs. One of the things that I've been talking with, and is it always something that comes back to me with the clients that I work with is communication.

You see a lot of people when they're working with ad managers, communication just falls off the person that who has been running ads just disappears. They don't hear from them or they have to, the client has to keep reaching out and asking questions and seeing what's going on, touching base to see if there is anybody still there running my ads and to get updates on what's going on. Now I get when campaigns go South sometimes you want to avoid those conversations.

You may not want to talk with your ideal clients or even when things are going really well. And you're busy with everything else. Sometimes the client communication can just slip through the cracks, which is a big mistake because it's, at those times when the clients start feeling like are they really giving my ads the attention they deserve or they really giving me the attention I deserve, I'm paying you to run these ads and all the negative thoughts start coming into it. Relationships are key to doing business.

When you communicate with your client, you are building up your relationships so that when things do get tough and admittedly they do with Facebook ads, not every campaign you launch is going to run out the gate and be 10 X ROI, a return on investment by the way. And so there will be ones that don't work. That's the name of the game. And when things don't work, it's being able to communicate with your clients and having that relationship to fall back on that they know that you've got their back because you're communicating with them.

That's, what's going to see you through and have a great longterm relationship because really the last thing you want as an ads manager is to be turning over clients every three months especially when you're working as a freelancer and you're working intimately with them. It takes a lot of time and effort to be onboarding clients all the time. . And then offboarding clients as well.

How to run facebook ads for clients

You really want to be working with clients for the longterm and communication is a key to that. So one of the things that I do when I start working with someone is I will communicate with them every day for 14 days. Just give them updates on what's going on with their ad account. Even if not too much it's happened. You've just been researching like audiences before the campaigns launched, or you've submitted copy off to the copywriter. You would just say, Hey, just touching base. We've got some copy and I'm getting created for your campaigns. We expect to have that back by Friday. I'll send that through to you for your review and comments, easy as that they know something's happened or the next day we've been dialing in, we found some great audiences.

We've been doing a lot of research here and looking into your previous data on your ad account. And we can see there's some great opportunities. And when we launch these campaigns that we would like to try, . So just communicating every day, because that first 14 days is really like a honeymoon period where you're setting up the relationship and the expectations. .

If you take someone on board and then they don't hear from you in the first three or four days and they're thinking, what on earth is going on? I haven't heard, I guess they're . Is there anything that I should be doing? It puts some doubt in, so be on the forefront with communication and just be touching base. Then as things are progressing and you're running their campaigns, a weekly report is something that clients love. They don't all read it, and they don't need to know everything that you are looking at when you're running the campaigns, all the conversion rates and everything like that, just a summary of this is where, how much the leads cost. This is how much it was cost per sale. This is how many sales that we're tracking.
And this is what the landing page conversion rate is like. Um, these are some areas that we”re going to be continuing to try some, um, audience testing with, or loading in some new copy this week, just a summary then as well saying what's happened in this last week and what you're looking at doing this week, whereas things have gone South.

What you're doing to overcome that and get things up to speed again. . Communication is gold there in your weekly reports as well. Then also just each week, a touch base at the start of the week saying, Hey, this is what we're working on this week, X, Y, Z. And then at the end of the week, do a wrap up. Because when you are working from home, things can roll over into the weekends so easily and you really want to take the weekends off. ? You want that to be your time? Not only because we're here to have this work life balance but also so that you can refresh and you can come into it being creative again on Monday.

So do a wrap up at the end of the way saying, Hey, . So as we discussed at the start of the week, we've done X, Y, Z, just signing off for the week. Do you have any questions? . And then they see a chance to come in with any questions, yeah great these are awesome. Answer the ones that you can and get back to the ones that you can't. I'll get back to you at the start of the week next week, and give you an update on these other questions. . So that is a great frame of it and then also, if there is something that's underway or in progress, or that's being actioned, if you do daily updates, just I have my clients in a Slack workspace, their own Slack workspace. And I might just say, hey, we've started working on this today. Um, I'll let you know how that goes, or we're anticipating, we'll be launching these ads today or any other back and forth communication that's going on.

Then again, just like we have the wrap up at the end of the week signing up for the week at the end of the day, saying, , just touching base at the end of the day, we've got X, Y, Z going on. . Now the key to this when, if you have 10 or 20 clients,
yes, that's going to be harder for you. But what I encourage you to do as an ad manager, where you're charging a higher rate, so you may think you need 10 or 20 clients or 10 clients for example charging a thousand dollars. You need to get 10 to make 10,000 a month. Well, that's where, when you're a bit more experienced, I would be recommending you as an ad manager, be charging at least $2,000 a month. Plus a percentage of ad spent. So even $3,000 a month and percentage of ad spend. So obviously you don't need to have that many clients to break that 10 K Mark. So, charge what you're worth and communicating are a couple of big things.

So obviously if you do have more clients, if you are working with 10 or 12 clients, get a VA on board, have someone to help you. That's going to be essential, especially with your communications and everything in the back end. Now, with that, that's where I would also recommend that you continue the communications. It's that relationship that you're building with with your client.

You don't want to assign that to somebody else. You continue to communicate and have you a VA or someone else to support you, who could do those other things in the back end, such as taking the daily data. . That's something that you don't exactly need to do. You're looking in Facebook all the time. You just outsource it. Have someone who can come on board and they can put all the daily data in and the weekly reporting that will save you hours, that you can put back into communicating with your clients as well, to build those relationships and have a happy ongoing clients. And that's what we love as ad managers.

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Have you ever wondered how much you should charge as an ad manager?

How much should I charge as an ad manager? That's a question I get asked all the time by members of my inner circle and other ad managers that I've been coaching over the years. So how much should you charge as an ad manager?

Well, that's kind of a bit of a long piece of string. It depends on a few various options, like who it is that you serve and what your experience level is like. And also what your mindset is like as I've spoken with ad managers over the years, and they've really struggled with charging higher prices, a lot of it comes back to their own mindset and what they think that they're worth.

You see a lot of ad managers and a lot of people in general, they struggle with the thing called imposter syndrome. And it's especially true for ad managers. A lot of us can feel like we get our worth from the results that we get with our ads. If things are doing great, we're riding high and you have that confidence to charge more but if things aren't going well, then it's kind of like, gee, should I even give them a refund? Well, that's a whole nother kettle efficient something for a whole nother episode. But coming back to our mindset and realizing what you're worth as an ad manager is one of the biggest things that's going to help you to decide what you can charge as an ad manager.

And we'll circle back to that one shortly, but first of all, what should you charge? Well, there's going to be various different levels, obviously when you're just starting out, you're not going to be charging $3,000 a month. Hello? Sorry. No, if you're new to it and if you've got, you know the learner wheels on. It's really not, integrous, if that's such a word for you to be going out and charging these high fees, if you don't know what you're doing.

So initial stages while you're learning you charge appropriately and you make it clear to the person that you're working with, that, yes, I am fairly new to Facebook ads but if you are happy to give me a go with this minimal charge and I'll give you my all and you don't have to learn Facebook ads, I'm doing all that for you. And I'll be able to apply everything that I'm learning into your campaign so that you can get the best results possible. And they'll go sure, yeah, that sounds great. I don't want to have to learn them, so please go ahead, feel free and do it.

So for myself, when I started out and I wasn't quite sure what I was doing. With my first client, I got paid $12 an hour to run Facebook ads. It's a starting point. And you know, I'm very glad to have had that experience. I've worked really hard by the hours I would have put in it was probably more like $4 an hour.

How to run facebook ads for clients
Because I just went above and beyond and seriously, that's sometimes what you need to do, especially when you're learning on the job as well. So you'll be putting in extra time to do that extra learning and then be implementing. So if you're starting out as an ad manager, hooray, kudos to you! Probably don't go with those thousand dollar marks.I would probably be benchmarking at a minimum of $500 a month to manage someone's ad campaigns.

And a great place to start is with a training program that I have for that, which is called the client attraction code. It's a fantastic strategy to help get you up and running with learning Facebook ads, as well as bringing great value to businesses. As they build audiences, you can go out, target their ideal client, start building that audience and be drawing them in and attracting their ideal client. So you can grab that over at jodymilward.com/tendollars. And that's a great place to start learning Facebook ads and offering that as a service to clients.

So from there though, if you have a client that is wanting to do lead generation campaigns,
that is someone who, or when they want people to opt in for a checklist or teach it or watch a webinar, then that would be a lead gen campaign. Now, in my inner circle, we had a couple of members recently who were working with clients who had like a $600 a month budget, which is not much wiggle room. It's about $20 a day.

So when you're doing lead gen campaigns at that level, yes, that could be something that you could again offer for like a $500 a month price point as you get to learn, because obviously that business owner, they don't have that big budget for someone to go all in spending, you know, $3,000 a month on their ads. They're just sort of starting out as well.

So it's a bit of a testing ground. So again, great place for you to learn but we need to make sure that the client would have those clear boundaries and expectations of like, well at $20 a day, we might get two leads in. We might get four, but there's a bit of testing underway. So when you are just starting out, don't overcharge and don't pretend to be something you're not, don't pretend to be someone who's been running Facebook ads for a long time.

You have all these case studies and success stories and stuff, be honest, okay, that's going to serve you so well in the long run. As you communicate with your clients saying yeah I am new to this. This is something that I'm learning, but I'm willing to do this at this reduced rate just for a little while, while you're getting your learner wheels off. And we can talk about increasing what your monthly retainer would be after you've, you know, worked with them for maybe a month or two and generating some results for them.

So that is a way you should be starting off as an ad manager and providing ad management services to clients and answering that question of how much should I charge? Now I know ad managers, who've been doing this for a couple of years. They know their stuff. They've gotten great results for clients, but they're still just charging a thousand dollars a month.

Now this is where I'm trying to teach them, educate them and show them that the value that they are bringing by running ads for clients and they're managing $5,000 a month ad spends they're generating leads and helping that business owner get sales and increase their revenue. So when you are doing that, when you are a Rainmaker for a business and you can do something,
that's helping them to improve their revenue, then you need to charge accordingly.

You are a very valuable asset to that business. And as you get the skills as you get the experience, and as you know what you're doing, then yes, charge a higher rate. And I'm not saying an hourly rate at all, go for a monthly retainer. And then that's up to you is how many hours are you going to do? I know for myself, I do put in a lot of hours and that's why like I charge a higher premium rate because as I like to say, when I kind of have a boutique style that I work with people it's very exclusive, very close. And so I give them the white glove treatment rather than the rubber glove treatment.

So when you're working and you have that kind of level of service, you can charge more and work really nicely intimately with people. And they know they're well looked after and well taken cared for. So if you're in that interim of like, I have just started out, but I don't have that confidence to be charging higher rates yet.

Look at what you've done. Look at the case studies, look at your own mindset, consider how you're viewing yourself. If you're viewing yourself as someone who is just, you know winging it and not getting results now, and then you need to look at your mindset and you need to, you identify that you have a very valuable skillset.

And by having that skillset, you're helping other people build their business. They need you! And so when you are a great ad manager, when you give it your all, and you do do your best, you are justified by charging those rates of what, $2,000 a month, $3,000 a month.

And then also this is where it's very popular with ad managers to either charge a percentage of ad spend on top of that monthly retainer, or possibly even a percentage of sales that have come in via Facebook. So you can see there, if you're charging $2000 or $3,000 a month and you work with a client that is, you know spending $10,000 a month and you're getting 10% of the ad spend so you get an extra thousand dollars. So you're rewarded for your hard work. What other businesses or careers can you get rewarded like that? Where it's like here, this is what I charge. And then I'm getting rewarded for my work. Sales, I know you get that with commissions but it's also a great benefit to being an ad and to be able to add that on because you're doing a great job and you should be rewarded for it.

Now you may be thinking most people can't afford to spend $2,000 a month for an ad manager. Well, if you have that conversation with someone where you are having a discovery call and you're seeing if they're a great fit for you and if they say, Oh, $2,000, I don't have that kind of money for an ad manager. Then they're not your ideal client. It's as simple as that. Some people will say yes, some people will say no. So what! You will find that with the rates that you charge, you will attract the right clients for you.

So if someone can't afford you, that's fine. You know, that's where they'll maybe need to go and hire somebody who is starting out an intern, so to speak. But if they're wanting someone else who is more experienced, then they need to pay for that service. And if they can't afford it, that's fine. You say, good luck. Look, I look forward to working with you at some point, when you are able in a position to be able to afford this management fee, that's it,

it's not the end of the world. There are millions and millions of businesses all around the world that you can tap into to offer Facebook ads as a service to, and between you and me, when you are working with people that are easy to say, yeah, sure. $2,000 a month. No problem, let's sign up! They're going to be sweet clients and away you go,it is possible.

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