Archives for October 21, 2021

What are your responsibilities as an Ad Manager?

Are you responsible for getting leads for your clients, or are you responsible for the sales for your client's offer? Are you responsible for copy, creative, or videos? That's what we're diving into.

First off, it depends on what is in your service agreement. Especially when it comes to copy, creative and videos because a lot of Ad Managers are a bit unsure of this. We often default to providing copy, doing creative and possibly even videos. So that needs to be clear in your service agreement from the start.

I know Ad Managers that charge $4,000 a month or even more, and they don't provide copy and creative. That's the client's responsibility. Now, if you are charging that price point and your client is paying, chances are, they've got a team in place. They've got a copywriter, someone that does their copy work, images and videos. They have a team that you can tap into and use their copy and creative. Now that's especially useful when they want to make sure everything is on-brand.

Now that's at a higher price point. What if you're charging $1,000 or $2,000 a month to run ads for clients? Should you include copy or creative? My answer is it's entirely up to you. If you are confident with your copywriting skills or can provide excellent quality images, then yes, you can include that.

You may want to include it as an additional service. You can say this is my base rate for running Facebook ads. This does not include copy, creative and videos. If you would like that to be included, it's an extra $500 a month or whatever it may be to incorporate that in because that's going to take additional time.

If you talk to any Ad Manager that's been busy running ad campaigns who also has to write copy, they’ll tell you copy can take hours to write because you need to know the avatar. You need to go off and do research. You need to go off to say Amazon and look at book reviews to find ideas of what to put into copy and what their ideal client is saying. Copy can take a lot of time. It's not just a simple matter of being an Ads Manager, getting the inspiration and then putting something in.

That can be put on as an additional service. So when it comes to your responsibility to do copy and creative, make that clear in your service agreement. That way if your client says you were supposed to be providing copy, it's there in the service agreement that copy wasn't to be provided.

Service agreements are great to protect you and to provide clarity for the potential client as well. So they know exactly what they are and are not getting. When it comes to using copy and particularly creative, many clients will tend to use very professionally graphic designed stuff. I love to use very native images, and they tend to work very well in the newsfeed. They don't stand out as an ad, and they look very informal. People will see it, and they'll think it's somebody that they know. So they'll stop and have a look and start to read.

How to Run Facebook Ads for clients

So when it comes to using creative, I would be talking to the client, asking them to provide selfies, for example, very native things. Even just pulling things from their page or even their personal profile to be used in ads. So that's one of your responsibilities as an ad manager to know if copy and creative is your responsibility or if it's the responsibility of your clients.

Now we're talking about lead generation. If you're doing lead generation campaigns, is it your responsibility to be getting leads for your clients? Well, if it's a new and unvalidated funnel, then I would say that is not entirely your responsibility. Does your client even know that this is something that their audience wants?

If they have been offering it organically and they’ve been able to get people to opt-in, then that’s a good sign that it is something that people want. However, when it's organic and when it's to warm traffic, it's very different results than it is with Facebook ads.

So I would be saying that in the first 90 days, in particular, that is your data-gathering exercise.
That's where you’ll be talking with your client, identifying the first avatar you want to target, getting the messaging and the copy right. Depending on how much ad budget they have will depend on how quickly you're going to get the results to see if the ad's not working or the landing pages not working as the conversion rate might be down.

As Ad Managers, we are very results-driven. It is up to us to get results for our clients. However, your client needs to make sure that they have an offer, product or service that their people want. Without ads, that's where we're going to be saying, this is your offer, product or service. Let's see how we can package it up with some great messaging and copy. Here are the audiences that we've tested before. We've run campaigns with other clients, and we know these audiences convert. So we'll start here, see what the ad data tells us, and then keep testing and revising.

It's likely going to take a while. You're not going to hit it out of the park straight away if it's all brand new. You need to be working on various versions of copy and creative and testing different audiences. So that's where it's going to take a few months. It is your responsibility to be working with your client, to be dialing in that messaging, dialing in that copy for them based on what they know about their ideal client. How you can get that message and that offer out to the audiences on Facebook to get results, and then be interpreting the data to make informed decisions of what to test, try next and get that information back to your client.

When it comes to sales, for example, a live webinar where people are opting in, they're watching the webinar, go off to a sales page, and go through to book a call. So your job there is again to be driving quality traffic through, opting in for the webinar.

Now, if the webinar is not generating sales, then yes, that's where most likely the client will say, the audiences are crap, you're bringing me bad leads. Is that the case? Or is it that the webinar is not converting? That's a decision that's only going to be made when you get more data through.

Like I spoke about with the lead gen campaigns, if they're being promoted to warm audiences, that will convert very differently to cold audiences. There's going to have to be a complete shift of expectation on the client's behalf that you'll have to educate them on if they're not aware. Warm audiences, they already know you, like you, trust you to some extent, and they're likely to convert much easier than just going straight out to cold traffic who don't know you and are just opting in for the first time.

So if they have been offering this to warm audiences, and it has converted. Then that's a promising sign and a great place to start when it comes to cold traffic. But I mean, if it hasn't been converting to warm audiences, why would it convert to cold? Also, suppose they haven't even tried converting it to warm audiences. In that case, you are starting at square one, and you're going to need to advise them to expect about 90 days for this to start showing us any real results because it's a data-gathering exercise.

To start with dialing in what the offer and the messaging is. Then, seeing if the ads are converting, people are getting to click, come through and opt-in. Then it may be having to optimize the opt-in page, as well as the sales page. That can only be done when audiences start coming through, when you start getting the numbers all coming through, that you can get a good amount of data.

With all of that, you're going to have to get at least 100 people in to watch the webinar before you can decide on whether the webinars are even converting. Because if you get 100 people to the webinar, you may get about a 2% – 3% conversion rate. So if that's the case, 3% would be good. If they're just starting out, then 2% would be lucky to get, unless they really know their audience and it's dialed in.

For 100 people to come in and let's say 2% conversion rate. Then that's 2 people to purchase. Now, if your client is spending $20 a day, they get 4 people to opt-in for the webinar, $5 each (some niches are $10 or $15). Let's just say $5 for someone to opt-in is $20 a day, 4 people a day are opting in. Look at that math. To get 100 people in and watch the webinar, that's going to be 20 days to get to sales.

So again, setting expectations with clients about getting the data, getting results is such a valuable thing. A lot of people might just think I can do this funnel or spend $50, and I'll get a sale. It just doesn't always work that way. So your responsibilities initially, working with clients, are to work with them, to get their message, offer, product or service dialed in and out to their ideal client.

Look at the numbers that are coming through and optimize where possible. Communicate back to the client where you're identifying some bottlenecks and what actions are being taken to resolve and see how you can improve things. Get more people to click through and get more people to opt-in, whether that's with the ads. Communicating back to your client, the landing page doesn't seem to be converting so well.

Communication and getting the data through is the name of the game, and that's where you as an Ad Manager are starting off initially. So if it's all been validated and if everything's been proven that the funnel converts at 5%. It is your responsibility to keep working with that and find those audiences, continue to enhance with their messaging, and offer to get those ideal clients over and help them get results.

So I hope this has been interesting and informative. If you've got any questions, you can reach out at [email protected] or if you want to know more about becoming a six-figure in-demand Ad Manager, download the guide here admanagerguide.com.

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